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About Us

President:
James S. Baldwin IEng, MIET, MIGPP, Dip Eng Mgmt

Chairman:
Andy England

Left to right :
Chris Jones, Council
Keith Greenhow, Engineering Committee
Alan Marshall, Engineering Committee
Geoff Turner, Engineering Director
James Baldwin, President
Ian Henderson, Council
Allan Jones, Membership Director
cofm

Mission Statement

To administer the re-creation, operation and maintenance of a lost class of British steam locomotive, using original design drawings, but incorporating 21st century design and manufacturing techniques. The locomotive - BR Standard class 6, 'Clan' type, number 72010 and named "HENGIST", will be the next in line of the original BR production series, which had been cancelled in 1955 due to steel shortages and a national change of motive power policy.

The locomotive will be of a modern, go anywhere, low maintenance, low running cost design, perfect for the 21st century. It will complement and help to complete telling the story of the 12 classes of British Railways’ Standard Locomotive design.

To this effect we will facilitate its demonstration and provide a display for historical, educational and recreational purposes, both on the main line and on heritage railways throughout the country.

Standard Steam Locomotive Company Limited

British Railways built the first 10 Clan locomotives which were built in 1951 and 1952. BR did order a further 15 Clans under Crewe Works Order Lot 242, however, this order was subsequently cancelled. The Standard Steam Locomotive Company Limited (parent body of THE 'CLAN' PROJECT) has been set up to build the 11th "Clan", using the original British railways design drawings. The company is also a registered charity no 1062 320.

The company is a private company limited by guarantee and has no shareholders. The company is run entirely by volunteers with a Council of Management elected at the Annual General Meeting by the membership. The council meets every month to manage the project. A specialist engineering team forms the Engineering Committee.

The engine is being constructed as a continuation of the original British Railways design sequence, adopting all the improvements outlined in the Lot 242 order and taking the name & number of the next locomotive scheduled on the original 1954 Crewe works itinerary: 72010 "HENGIST". We also aim to tackle the fine tuning that was not completed in British Railways time.

In November 2017, the project entered a new and exciting phase. CTL Seal Co Ltd, based in Sheffield, have been contracted to start assembling the frames. The picture above shows members of the Council of Management and the Engineering Committee at CTL Seal's premises to view the start of the frame assembly.

Why Build a Clan?

A common question that we are asked is why we have decided to build a Clan 6MT pacific locomotive. The existing steam locomotive fleet as used on the main line and on heritage lines is now getting quite old. Maintenance costs are rising. A large number of these engines have spent a long time in the sea air at Woodhams scrapyard in Barry, South Wales. Although these locomotives can continue to be repaired, we believe that it is more cost effective to manufacture a new locomotive. This will ensure that steam locomotives can continue to fascinate for the foreseeable future.

So why pick the Clan as the locomotive? Cecil J. Allan, the doyen of train performance recording, said that the Clans were "One of the least distinguished in their performance of all the British standard locomotive types". Yet to crews who were prepared to adapt to them and to the operator, they were solid, reliable machines. We know that the draughting was not right - again Allan states "They can steam, providing they are worked fairly hard". We also know that the Standards did not employ modern draughting systems. 71000 Duke of Gloucester has shown what can be achieved if the draughting is improved and our aim is to provide an improved system for our locomotive.

The major reason for choosing a Clan is that it will provide a relatively modern, low maintenance, locomotive. It will have a go-anywhere capability as it has a higher route availability than other Pacific locomotives. A minor point is that we will fill a gap in locomotive history as none of the Clans were preserved.

Current Status - 21 October 2021

Click on the images for a larger image

stretcher

Our base is at the premises of CTL Seal Ltd in NE Sheffield. CTL Seal are a specialist engineering company operating in various sectors including nuclear, oil & gas, sub-sea, mining and renewable energy. They are used to designing and building one-off projects and are admirably suited to working with the Clan Project. CTL Seal have been very generous in giving us an area in their assembly shop. This means that Hengist will be assembled in a nice dry and (relatively in winter!) warm area.

Establishing a base in Sheffield in November 2017 has allowed us to consolidate all of our components at a single base. With thanks to Canklow Storage we have obtained a large container which we have filled with components that have already been procured. Large frame components are stored within the assembly shop.

Most of our activity in 2018 was connected with the machining of the cast steel frame stretchers. These stretchers are unique to 71000 Duke Of Gloucester and the lot 242 Clans (see the history section). They hold the main frame plates apart and support the structure around the driving axles. The main frame assembly is shown below in the CTL Seal assembly area; note the original British Railways drawings on the boards in the background together with some drawings from our CAD models. 2019 saw the start of assembly of the frames - a lot of work has gone into ensuring that the frames are accurately aligned and that the frame stretchers are fitting closely.

stretcher

The frames have been assembled with fitted bolts (which are a tight fit within the hole); here you can see Pete from CTL Seal reaming one of the holes using a magnetic base drill. Note that the frames are upside down in this image. The British Railways standard locomotive frames were assembled using cold riveting. That skill is very hard to find these days so we have used a fitted bolt solution. This provides a much stronger join at the expense of more work. Each frame hole is undersize and has been reamed out to the correct size. Philidas lock nuts have been used to secure the bolts.

In September 2020 the frames moved to the large Juaristi machining station within CTL Seal where the hornguides were machined. The rear frame extensions were not fitted at this stage as the assembly would be too large for the machining station. Here the axle box hornguides (The U shaped openings in the frame) were machined so that the hornguides across the frame are accurately aligned with each other. The frame keeps and keep pads were machined so that each keep will then be unique to its location. In October, the frames were returned to the assembly area. Here's a photo of the frames being set up on the Juaristi machining station.

stretcher

The Covid lockdowns in 2020 and 2021 have affected operations but we have continued to make progress, albeit more slowly, throughout the pandemic.

A key activity in the late spring of 2021 was ensuring that the smokebox saddle was "fitted" to the inside of the frames. For this job, we brought in Dave Reynolds who is the Chief Mechanical Engineer at the East Lancashire Railway. This involved coating the sides of the smokebox saddle with engineering blue dye and then lowering the saddle back into position in the frames. Then the SSLC "Monday Gang" tightened up the 38 fixing bolts per side. Once that was complete, the 38 bolts were loosened and removed. The saddle was removed from the frames and Dave to see where the high points were on the frame by the transfer of engineers blue. A grinding wheel was used to remove the high spots and then the exercise was repeated - many times over 4 days! Here is Dave applying the engineers blue.

stretcher

Over the summer, work has involved fitting the frame extensions which sit under the firebox and have the engine dragbox at the rear. There are a lot of fastenings where the frame extensions are fastened to the main frames and these need to be carefully checked before machining the fitted to bolts to size. The photo shows the frame extensions being set up at the right height. The screw jacks are being used to set the height - relative to the bottom of the frames. Temporary sections of angle iron are being tack welded to the top and bottom of the frame extensions to ensure the correct alignment.

stretcher

Fixing the frame extensions means drilling and reaming all of the bolt holes to size and then driving in fitted bolts. First, the frame extensions will be fastened to the main frames; then the front firebox support stretcher will be fitted. This area will require the installation of 38 fitted bolts per side. Fitting work must ensure that the firebox support and the dragbox fit tightly within the frames. Once this work is complete, we can git the hind beam and the massive supporting gussets.

Riveting will be required for the front buffer beam and components. Also, riveting required around the hind beam components.

Up in Scotland, our pattern maker - Tony Dance - is building the patterns for the main cylinders. This is a complex pattern consisting of 4 major sections. The 2 lower sections are 2 halves of the main driving cylinder. Sitting above that are the 2 halves of the valve cylinder. Tony will then have to build in all of the passages that transfer steam into the valve cylinder, from the valve cylinder to the driving cylinder and from the driving cylinder to the blastpipe. You can read all about the pattern making by following this link. Tony has completed the main motion cylinder pattern and is now working on the valve cylinder pattern. Although this is smaller in diameter than the motion cylinder, it is longer and has a more complex shape. There will be a lot of complex wood working required to create the "cores" and "prints" necessary to create the required holes in the finished casting. You can read about cores and prints by following this link. The current situation is that Tony is now building the core boxes which will make the air spaces within the cylinders.

bogie

Manufacturing of bogie components is progressing. The central bogie stretcher has borne the brunt of the impact of Covid and has now completed all machining. It has been set up on trestles in the assembly shop and trail fitting of components has commenced. The image shows the central bogie stretcher casting on a machining station at CTL Seal. The bogie frame plates are attached to the sides of the stretcher - the vertical faces in the photo. The pivot on the locomotive frames engage with a centre slide which slides on the 2 central faces. You can see the circular recesses for the bolster pads. This is where the weight of the front of the engine is transferred to the bogie. All of the components for frame assembly are now ready for assembly.

The centre slide has been installed but teh clearances between the stretcher and the slide are on the tight side. This will be rectified by a light skim on a machine. Assembly of the bogie frame will follow the same system as for the main frames. The bogie frame plates will be installed and secured with temporary bolts. The frame stays and the AWS receiver stay will be installed. Then the frame will be checked for alignment and squareness before all fixing holes will be drilled and reamed to final size. The fitted bolts can then be installed.

Phase 2 of bogie construction involves the wheelsets. One of the main components is the cannon axlebox which is a casting comprising of 2 axleboxes and a central tube. This contains the wheel bearings and associated components; the axle runs through the centre. The cannon boxes have now been cast and after final testing, they will require final machining. Wheel bearings are on order and drawings have been created for the internal components within the cannon boxes. The bogie wheels have been cast, tyres are now in stock at the South Devon Railway (who will assemble the wheel sets) and the axles are expected later this year.

Phase 3 of the bogie construction involves the suspension and side control springs. A discussion has been held with a spring manufacturer to agree the specification. The spring cradle plates are now in stock and will require assembly. All other associated cradle components are in stock. We are continuing to explore options for the side control springs. The original design is for a rectangular section coil spring and it has been difficult to find a manufacturer with the capability.

Next project will be the trailing or pony truck. This will be a coil spring system using the design from 71000 Duke of Gloucester which again was destined for the lot 242 Clans instead of the leaf spring design used on the original 10 Clans. Again design work is well under way and you can see the CAD models in the Construction > Build Section. We currently have sponsorship for the wheels. The pattern has been loaned from the Mid Hants Railways and the wheels have been cast by Boro Foundry in the West Midlands. The wheels are currently passing through post casting treatment.

boiler

We have also started work on the boiler as this will be a long lead item. The image shows 70000 Britannia's boiler being installed at Crewe on 9 March 2010 - with thanks to the copyright owner Nigel Fraser Ker and his web site http://www.fraserker.com/britannia/ for allowing us to use this photo. Hengist's boiler is slightly smaller than 70000, we have most of the British Railways drawings for the boiler and firebox. Our first job is a design study to see where the existing design fits with modern boiler regulations. We are also examining where modern manufacturing techniques would be appropriate. We have been visiting potential suppliers as part of our design study. Our initial study has recommended that we build an all welded boiler with a steel inner firebox, using a working pressure of 250 psi (the original Clans had a working pressure of 225 psi).

3DModel

Click on the above image to enlarge it. One of the major advantages of building a locomotive in the 21st century is the availability of 3D computer modelling. As we develop each detailed drawing (from the original British Railways drawings), Keith then builds the drawing into our 3D model. This allows us to check that the drawing is correct as it fits into the model. The ability to manipulate the view of the model in 3D allows us to check for fit and any potential fouling problem.

Meet the Team

Patron

David Buck

 
MS2 David spent his formative years in Ipswich and witnessed the arrival of the first standard Britannias and has always been attracted to the Standard 'Pacifics' being a shareholder in Brittania itself for a number of years. During his working life in the film and television industry, railways remained a passion, building a half mile standard gauge railway in his garden near Windsor. This is operated by a 1928 Peckett 0-4-0 Hornpipe and a 1919 Aveling & Porter ‘traction engine on wheels, Sir Vincent. More recently, a 5ft gauge track has been laid for a 1955 Finnish 'Pacific' locomotive which has now been restored to operation. Other steam locomotives in David’s ownership include the earliest existing Hunslet Vigilant and a Finnish 2-8-2.
Following his retirement in 2014, David acquired Thompson B1 Class 4-6-0 Nº 61306 Mayflower and the following year operated many mainline runs. Following an extensive overhaul, Mayflower is now based at Southall and back on regular mainline operations.
In 2018, David acquired the railtour promoter 'Steam Dreams' and introduced the regular 'Windsor Steam Express' trains from Waterloo. He is also an avid Railwayana collector, his nameplate collection including Clan Cameron.
David is Vice President of the Friends of the National Railway Museum, South of England Group and a Patron of the Science Museum, the NRM, the London Transport Museum and the British Postal Museum.

President

James Baldwin IEng, MIET, MIGPP, Dip Eng Mgmt

 
MS2 James is a multi-skilled professional Broadcast TV Engineer, Producer and Director, having held significant posts within the TV industry, working with all major Broadcasters in a "Live News" environment.
An author and historian, he's working on newly commissioned titles and produces material for the National Railway Museum, monthly periodicals, major 'high-street' retail outlets, industrial companies, heritage railways and is a regular broadcaster on TV and Radio, particularly concerning Flying Scotsman. James is a technical / historical advisor and Ambassador for 'The British Postal Museum and Mail-Rail Museum' at Mount Pleasant, London currently producing a book about this railways history.
A consultant to the Indo-China Rail Company, James advised with the restoration of Tu Luc 2-8-2 steam locomotives for use on a meter-gauge railway in Vietnam between Hue & Da Nang as a tourist attraction and for the railways reopening.
James is actively involved in repatriating former British built steam locomotives and rolling stock from around the world, for inclusion in the Military Railway and British Overseas Heritage Railway Museum's currently being established.
He is an active participant of the All Party Parliamentary Group meetings on Rail and Heritage Railways, which are held at the Houses of Parliament.
James is the Chairman of the Friends of the National Railway Museum, South of England Group, Chairman of 'The Barnsley Trust' and is involved with many other heritage railway groups.

Council of Management

Members of the Council of Management are elected by the members and serve for a 3 year term.

Chairman

Andrew England

 
MS2 Andy is a dyslexic Yorkshireman who started his working life aged 16, as a welder in Rotherham. At the age of 30 he started an engineering company manufacturing items for the coal mining industry.
Fast forward to present times, and Andy is now a shareholder and director of six companies employing over 230 people. The companies supply multiple industries and markets which include subsea, oil and gas, nuclear, new Biomass Plants, renewable, heavy construction from his companies located in Sheffield and Stoke.
Andy is also involved in constructing and supplying components for ‘The Clan Project’s new build steam locomotive ~ Hengist.
He also has a company that refurbishes train seats for the whole of the rail industry.
At present, Andy is hoping to create 30 new jobs within the next 18 month period - fingers crossed with 50% through apprenticeships.
 

Membership Director

Allan Jones ACQI

 
MS2 Until his retirement in 2009, the majority of Allan's 45 year working life was spent in Retail Motor Industry Aftersales.
In 2001 Allan joined a small, family run, group of dealerships in the south east of England, where he was responsible, as Group Quality, Environmental, Health & Safety and Warranty Manager for the administrative wellbeing of 5 different franchises spread over 11 premises from Sidcup in the east to Chichester in the west.
Allan's involvement in THE 'CLAN' PROJECT started with the 'call to arms' of persons interested in rescuing the project following the events leading up to the E.G.M. in 2011 and he has served the project as Membership Secretary since the formation of the new management structure, being elected to the position of Chairman at the 2017 Annual General Meeting.
Allan also compiles and edits the project's 'house magazine' 'CLAN NEWS' and, among other things, is responsible for the brand imaging of the project.
Allan's railway history stems from boyhood days (mis)spent on the plethora of lines in and around the south Wales coalfield in the 50s & 60s, along with a short period (1960 - 1961) when he discovered the delights of Southern steam (and 3rd rail electrics) in south London and Kent.
A dyed in the wool disciple of all things 'Swindon', Allan is, nonetheless, a lover of the British Railways Standard classes, with a particular fondness for 9Fs that goes back to ore trains on the Ebbw Valley lines before the demise of B.R. steam.
When not engaged in 'Clan' project business, Allan helps to run a rescue charity for abandoned & abused dogs, taking in, rehabilitating and rehoming dogs from Spain, Crete & Romania, in addition to cruelty cases from within the U.K.
 

Engineering Director

Geoff Turner I Eng MIED

 
MS2 Geoff has admired the BR Standard class of locomotives ever since his teenage years when he was railway modelling, seeing the style of the locos aesthetically pleasing, the range of classes following a family resemblance, with a class of locomotive for every duty. In his later years, as an engineering designer, only then fully appreciating Robin Riddles design philosophy in standardisation to produce the standard class locomotives.
He never saw any 'Clans' when he was young; he was 12 years of age when steam finished on British Railways. So was a little envious when he discovered that his friend saw 72007, 72008 and 72009 when they were on Millhouses Shed, Sheffield. Millhouses Shed now demolished is not far from where he lives now.
Geoff joined the Standard Steam Locomotive Company in 2002 after a visit to a gala event at Barrow Hill Roundhouse, near Chesterfield, where he saw the cab and front end. (Front Platform Plates, Cover Plates, Buffer Beam complete with oval buffers and Smokebox Door). He immediately struck a conversation with the team on the sales stall and was hooked. It's there he met Mike Sedgley who had organised the sales pitch for the project and Mike is still organising sales stands for the project today. A few years later when the project was based at Herston Works, Swanage he helped, on a couple of occasions, setting up supports for the Frame Extensions, for display, and drilling the Cab side plates.
Geoff's previous involvement in heritage railways was with Peak Rail at Matlock and Buxton, in track laying, building work and involved on a number of committees. He also joined the team led by Brell Ewart to rescue 4MT 80080 from Barry scrap yard, going on to help with its strip down. A few years later, Geoff helped Phil Brown rescue 9F 92214.
Geoff's career in engineering has taken him to Scotland, South Africa, Norway and Egypt, working in various industries. For the last 17 years he has worked in the oil and gas industry mainly designing subsea oil well equipment.
When not involved with railways Geoff enjoys walking in the hills and valleys of Derbyshire with his wife and daughter, but not so much walking with his daughter these days as she is now living in Birmingham.
 

Finance Director

Paul Waldron LLB Chartered ALIBF MCSI

 
MS2 A Devonian by birth, Paul missed the steam age, being only 7 when it officially 'ended'. His interest in railways was fostered by his grandfather with whom he spent many hours, in the late 60s/early 70s, watching 'Westerns' and 'Warships' amongst others, weaving along the coast at Teignmouth. His childhood was spent in Dorset, living next to the main line where he observed Hymeks & Cromptons heading back and forth to Weymouth.
Although he is a 'sleeping member' of a number of diverse railway societies, he has a particular interest in the railways of Cumbria, which he got to know about when living up there when first starting his career in banking.
Why the significance of Cumbria? Well, the County has a strong relationship with the BR Standard Clan 4-6-2s, with 5 members of the class being based at Kingmoor, Carlisle, withdrawn only in 1965/66. He has come across several people who remembered them well, regarding them as 'good engines', scuppered by the politics of the BR Modernisation Plan. One friend in particular talked longingly of the RCTS Ribble-Lune Railtour of 1964, where he photographed 72007 Clan Mackintosh stood in the former Preston & Lancaster station at Lancaster. It was he who said 'there is a group building a new Clan', which led to Paul join the 'Clan' to see if he could help bring a brand new '72010' to steam.
In 2015 Paul volunteered to become Finance Director for the Project, having acted as Treasurer and Independent Examiner for a number of other charities and organisations. He recently (2018) retired following a 35-year career in financial services but remains a Chartered Associate of the London Institute of Banking & Finance and a Member of the Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment.
 

Commercial Director

Robert Ife AIRO

 
MS2 Bob has been interested in steam locomotives for most of his life, having witnessed the end of steam in the Nottingham area with the final ironstone workings in the hands of 8F locomotives.
He became involved with steam preservation in the form of 9F 92212 when it was under restoration at the Great Central Railway, working on several aspects of both the engine and tender during this time. That was when he learned the meaning of heavy engineering.
He joined the Clan Project in 2010 as an ordinary member, assisting on the sales stall when he was able at Loughborough.
When the EGM was called in 2011, he volunteered to become part of the management team of the project, initially as member of the Council of Management without portfolio, assisting the other officers as required.
He was later persuaded to take on the role of Commercial Officer, later Commercial Director, which he has fulfilled to the best of his ability since. He has since also taken over the Media portfolio, in addition to being the qualified company Health and Safety representative.
Outside of the project, Bob is a professional train driver and, in this capacity, he can bring over 30 years of experience in the rail industry to the table for the benefit of the team as they make decisions about mainline running.
Bob is now an Associate Member of the Institute of Rail Operators. This brings added benefits to the project, in having a qualified rail professional as part of the management team.
 

BRSLOG Director

Christopher Jones

 
MS2 Chris has been an avid rail enthusiast all his life, being introduced to them by his father who had been a Fireman working out of 18D Staveley Midland, more widely known now as Barrow Hill Roundhouse. During the 1970's and 80's he travelled all over the country, especially Scotland behind the diesels using various rover tickets. His love of railways encompasses not only steam but also extends to modern freight, light railway networks, diesels, both heritage and modern plus model railways. He owns and regularly runs a 5in gauge 'Peak' diesel at his local Model Engineering Societies track and at other invited events around the country.
His working life was spent entirely in the heavy engineering sector, specialising in parts and logistics, but also with a wide range of experience in forklift, crane and lifting operations.
His many interests outside of railways includes, cycling, fell walking, photography, listening to rock music, including live bands, motorcycling, bird watching and nature in general. He has a passion for producing new build steam utilising the latest technology and using the highest spec materials. Chris is always kept busy with his HENGIST activities as he is a member of the engineering team, the management team, and also runs the sales events and co-ordinates the Monday working parties in addition to his British Rail Standard Locomotive Group duties.
 

Project Director

Ian Henderson CEng MBCS CITP

 
MS2 Ian started his career as a pilot in the RAF. After gaining his wings, defence cuts meant a change of career, initially as an instructor at an Outward Bound establishment in the Lake District. The next stage in his career was to become a trials engineer testing conducting the early avionics trials for the Panavia Tornado aircraft. This involved 2 specially modified Blackburn Buccaneer aircraft, kitted out with Tornado avionics. Another job followed on the Tornado project, this time working as the company's engineering representative at BAe Warton (Preston) on the Tornado ADV Missile Management System. This involved supporting the equipment through initial ground rig trials through flight testing to production.

After the conclusion of the development phase of the project, Ian changed jobs to a supplier to the NHS managing a large database system for a national NHS system. A key challenge, performed on time, on budget, was migrating 14 different regional Health Authority systems into a single national system. Shortly afterwards, Ian managed the transfer of the company into an employee owned organisation.

Ian is a Chartered Engineer and is a Member of the British Computer Society.

He is a paraglider pilot flying in the Lake District and is secretary of the local club. He has restored a number of old vehicles including an MGB and a Lightweight Land Rover. He still has the Triumph T90 motorcycle he bought at school! He has been interested in railways for as long as he can remember (and before according to his parents).
 

Quality Director

John Hind BSc CEng MIMechE

 
MS2 John is a chartered mechanical engineer and member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, who has worked in management roles in manufacturing, quality, project management on large power station contracts for GEC/ALSTOM and automotive projects for Bentley Motors Ltd. The GEC/ALSTOM projects included nuclear, combined cycle, fossil-fired and hydropower plants in the UK and the Far East. Bentley projects included the iconic Continental GT, Arnage, and Mulsanne. In both industries, John worked on all project phases from starting with a blank sheet of paper through to completion. Project values were from £14M to £600M. John's experience runs from heavy engineering on power stations through to the intricacies of sewing patterns on car seats!

As a toddler, John's first memory of steam is family trips from Kirkham to Blackpool South hauled by steam and the last days of the Stainmore Line. A family move to Somerset in the early 1960s meant John saw the last of Western Region steam and the transition to diesel.

John's practical involvement with steam began in the early 70's when he was a member of the Taunton Group of the Great Western Society and as a 16-year-old spent summer weekends in 1970 and 1971 helping to rescue from the Barry scrapyard 5572 and 7202.

1971 saw a move to Manchester to start a student apprenticeship with GEC and a University course in mechanical engineering.

In the early 1990s, John joined school friends from Taunton, as a shareholder in ex GWR 2-6-2 tank 5542 and was project engineer for the boiler overhaul and organised the manufacture of new parts for the boiler and locomotive. Since the return to traffic in 2002 he has helped with its maintenance.

In 2003, John had two articles published in Steam Railway on new build steam. John was elected Chairman of the Advanced Steam Traction Trust in 2006 and for them designed the Lempor exhaust fitted to the KWVR's S160 No5820.

Since taking voluntary redundancy from Bentley at the end of 2018, John volunteers in the workshops of the East Lancashire Railway and helped restore to running order, the 1881 built Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway 0-6-0 Saddletank No 752.

John's other interests include cycling, skiing and Flight Simulation.
 

Other Posts

Secretary

Stephen Loeber MIES AIRO

 
sl I worked in the railway industry for 37 years, mainly within the signalling grades, however I was a trainer for five years doing signalling courses: I have now retired.

I have been a member of the 73082 Camelot Locomotive Society for 23 years, being elected to the Committee of Management in the position of Secretary in 2002. I have been covering the role for 17 years. My main responsibility is arranging the AGM and general administrative duties. I have also been involved in changing the Society to a CIO.

I have been a member of the Steam Tug Portwey Trust Ltd for 6 years, being elected onto the Management Committee in the position of Assistant Health & Safety Officer in 2016, then becoming the Health & Safety Officer, with my main responsibility being the managing of Health & Safety matters. I have been doing the role for 4 years, also become Company Administrator this year dealing with Companies House and Charities Commission, plus arranging AGM and general administrative duties.

Also I have been a signalman with the Bluebell Railway for the past 3 years and have recently re-joined the South Devon Railway signalling department.

In regards to Portwey I have been a stoker for the past 6 years now in training to be an engineer this is with assistance from the Boiler, Engineering Skills Training Trust.

I am a member of the Institution of Engineers & Shipbuilders of Scotland and an affiliated member of the Institution of Railway Operators.

Engineering Committee

Engineering Director

Geoff Turner I Eng MIED

MS2 Geoff has admired the BR Standard class of locomotives ever since his teenage years when he was railway modelling, seeing the style of the locos aesthetically pleasing, the range of classes following a family resemblance, with a class of locomotive for every duty. In his later years, as an engineering designer, only then fully appreciating Robin Riddles design philosophy in standardisation to produce the standard class locomotives.
He never saw any 'Clans' when he was young; he was 12 years of age when steam finished on British Railways. So was a little envious when he discovered that his friend saw 72007, 72008 and 72009 when they were on Millhouses Shed, Sheffield. Millhouses Shed now demolished is not far from where he lives now.
Geoff joined the Standard Steam Locomotive Company in 2002 after a visit to a gala event at Barrow Hill Roundhouse, near Chesterfield, where he saw the cab and front end. (Front Platform Plates, Cover Plates, Buffer Beam complete with oval buffers and Smokebox Door). He immediately struck a conversation with the team on the sales stall and was hooked. It's there he met Mike Sedgley who had organised the sales pitch for the project and Mike is still organising sales stands for the project today. A few years later when the project was based at Herston Works, Swanage he helped, on a couple of occasions, setting up supports for the Frame Extensions, for display, and drilling the Cab side plates.
Geoff's previous involvement in heritage railways was with Peak Rail at Matlock and Buxton, in track laying, building work and involved on a number of committees. He also joined the team led by Brell Ewart to rescue 4MT 80080 from Barry scrap yard, going on to help with its strip down. A few years later, Geoff helped Phil Brown rescue 9F 92214.
Geoff's career in engineering has taken him to Scotland, South Africa, Norway and Egypt, working in various industries. For the last 17 years he has worked in the oil and gas industry mainly designing subsea oil well equipment.
When not involved with railways Geoff enjoys walking in the hills and valleys of Derbyshire with his wife and daughter, but not so much walking with his daughter these days as she is now living in Birmingham.
 

Graham Ashton C Eng, MIMechE - Project Engineer - Procurement

GA I am now getting on a bit but do not feel old – now being 71 years. I was a trainspotter during my early years and enjoyed going to Frodingham Sheds(36C) regularly via push bike. I saw all A4’s at Doncaster except Nos 2 & 4, I cabbed the Prototype Deltic at Doncaster and saw all Deltics twice.
At the age of 16 - I was told to give this up and concentrate on GCE’s which I did. I was offered jobs as Apprentice Fitter Turner at all 3 steelworks at Scunthorpe – went to Appleby Frodingham – did ONC at Tech Coll and then went to Bradford University 1968 to 1972 ending up with B Tech Hons Mech Eng. After spells on Plant Engineering I moved into Project Engineering and Project Management – and became a MIMech E - C Eng – being involved in many Continuous Casting Projects, New BOS Vessels etc.
I spent 44 years at British Steel, Corus , Tata Steel.
I am now retired and enjoy DIY, Velocette MAC Motorcycles and Canal Boats – not to mention helping with Hengist project matters and hoping to see 72010 on the rails.
 

Mike Beswick MIET MIExpE - Lead Engineer - Mainline Certification

MB My career was in the defence industry where I spent around 35 years in research. This included some quite diverse areas such as mixing and filling pastes, the material properties of metals and polymers, and the design of projectiles. The work was mostly small, but complete, projects taken from design, to manufacture, test, analysis and report writing. During the period I worked with colleagues from Europe and America in multinational projects. I took early retirement in 2007 forming my own company again working in the defence industry, but for the last 5 years I have also worked renovating cars from a workshop in Lancashire.
 

John Birkinshaw - Quality System Manager

 

James Conway MIED - CAD Modeller

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Keith Greenhow - CAD Modelling Manager

kg I joined the Clan Project and Engineering Committee in 2014, after being persuaded by Geoff who I was working with at the time in subsea engineering, I was made responsible for CAD modelling.
Although not a lifelong enthusiast, like others on the project, I have always found the engineering involved in all transport really interesting to me as an engineer and the offer of joining the project team building a full size steam loco was not to be missed and has fitted in nicely with my retirement.
I've earned my crust in engineering since 1970 where I did a proper apprenticeship at David Brown Tractors, Meltham, studying at Huddersfield tech and Polytechnic which is now the university.
When tractors closed down, at the end of the 80s, I went into contract mechanical design work mainly in the automotive industry but also aerospace, coal industry, sub-micron measuring and subsea oil and gas.
Up to the early 90s this was all drawing board work but by then Personal Computers were becoming more affordable so I bought one and went back to Huddersfield tech to learn how to use it for 2D CAD.
Of course things don't stand still so I learned 3D CAD whilst working in the subsea oil and gas industry which I use today for our Hengist locomotive.
 

Ian Henderson C Eng, MBCS, CITP - Project Manager

jb Ian started his career as a pilot in the RAF. After gaining his wings, defence cuts meant a change of career, initially as an instructor at an Outward Bound establishment in the Lake District. The next stage in his career was to become a trials engineer testing conducting the early avionics trials for the Panavia Tornado aircraft. This involved 2 specially modified Blackburn Buccaneer aircraft, kitted out with Tornado avionics. Another job followed on the Tornado project, this time working as the company's engineering representative at BAe Warton (Preston) on the Tornado ADV Missile Management System. This involved supporting the equipment through initial ground rig trials through flight testing to production.

After the conclusion of the project, Ian moved into managing a large database system for a national NHS system. A key challenge, performed on time, on budget, was migrating 14 different regional Health Authority systems into a single national system.

Ian is a Chartered Engineer and is a Member of the British Computer Society.
He is a paraglider pilot flying in the Lake District and is secretary of the local club. He has restored a number of old vehicles including an MGB and a Lightweight Land Rover. He still has the Triumph T90 motorcycle he bought at school! He has been interested in railways for as long as he can remember (and before according to his parents).
 

John Hind - Lead Engineer - Inspection

jh John is a chartered mechanical engineer and member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, who has worked in management roles in manufacturing, quality, project management on large power station contracts for GEC/ALSTOM and automotive projects for Bentley Motors Ltd. The GEC/ALSTOM projects included nuclear, combined cycle, fossil-fired and hydropower plants in the UK and the Far East. Bentley projects included the iconic Continental GT, Arnage, and Mulsanne. In both industries, John worked on all project phases from starting with a blank sheet of paper through to completion. Project values were from £14M to £600M. John's experience runs from heavy engineering on power stations through to the intricacies of sewing patterns on car seats!
As a toddler, John's first memory of steam is family trips from Kirkham to Blackpool South hauled by steam and the last days of the Stainmore Line. A family move to Somerset in the early 1960s meant John saw the last of Western Region steam and the transition to diesel.
John's practical involvement with steam began in the early 70's when he was a member of the Taunton Group of the Great Western Society and as a 16-year-old spent summer weekends in 1970 and 1971 helping to rescue from the Barry scrapyard 5572 and 7202.
1971 saw a move to Manchester to start a student apprenticeship with GEC and a University course in mechanical engineering.
In the early 1990s, John joined school friends from Taunton, as a shareholder in ex GWR 2-6-2 tank 5542 and was project engineer for the boiler overhaul and organised the manufacture of new parts for the boiler and locomotive. Since the return to traffic in 2002 he has helped with its maintenance.
In 2003, John had two articles published in Steam Railway on new build steam. John was elected Chairman of the Advanced Steam Traction Trust in 2006 and for them designed the Lempor exhaust fitted to the KWVR's S160 No5820.
Since taking voluntary redundancy from Bentley at the end of 2018, John volunteers in the workshops of the East Lancashire Railway and helped restore to running order, the 1881 built Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway 0-6-0 Saddletank No 752.
John's other interests include cycling, skiing and Flight Simulation.
 

Chris Jones - BR Standard Locomotive Owners Group Contact

cj Chris has been an avid rail enthusiast all his life, being introduced to them by his father who had been a Fireman working out of 18D Staveley Midland, more widely known now as Barrow Hill Roundhouse. During the 1970's and 80's he travelled all over the country, especially Scotland behind the diesels using various rover tickets. His love of railways encompasses not only steam but also extends to modern freight, light railway networks, diesels, both heritage and modern plus model railways. He owns and regularly runs a 5in gauge 'Peak' diesel at his local Model Engineering Societies track and at other invited events around the country.
His working life was spent entirely in the heavy engineering sector, specialising in parts and logistics, but also with a wide range of experience in forklift, crane and lifting operations. His many interests outside of railways includes, cycling, fell walking, photography, listening to rock music, including live bands, motorcycling, bird watching and nature in general. He has a passion for producing new build steam utilising the latest technology and using the highest spec materials. Chris is always kept busy with his HENGIST activities as he is a member of the engineering team, the management team, and also runs the sales events and co-ordinates the Monday working parties in addition to his British Rail Standard Locomotive Group duties.
 

Alan Marshall - CAD Draughtsman

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Dr Phil Yates CEng MIMechE - Metrology Engineer

jb Before attending University Phil was working as a time server vehicle technician. After completing his PhD on the study of diesel engine emissions, Phil started as a director in a small IT company working in the high volume printing industry. After 6 years of being constantly on call and spending more hours in the car than working on projects at home Phil joined the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) in Sheffield.

Working at the AMRC Phil works on industrial robots, industrial automation systems and large volume metrology. He has also worked on projects for many blue chip companies such as Airbus, BAE, Boeing, Rolls Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Aston Martin. While at the AMRC Phil has submitted a patent application on a novel component of an autonomous mobile aircraft inspection system.

Phil does not know much about railways at all, but likes the engineering challenge of building a steam locomotive from 2D drawings when all of the tacit knowledge has been lost.

Phil is a Chartered Engineer and a member of the IMechE. Like other members of the engineering team Phil has worked on many types of vintage transport from F type Jaguars, Austin Nippy sports to a 1898 Humber keel. At present Phil has a fleet of Peugeot 205s with an average odometer reading of 250,000 miles and two Triumph motorcycles that he has owned since he was in his early 20s.